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Author Topic: end plates as ground?  (Read 2069 times)
ROADTRASH
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« on: June 22, 2012, 10:36:38 AM »

Hi all my name is Steve I am very new to this world of HHO I built a dry cell and am using the end plates for the ground connection what are the pros and cons of doing this???
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D.O.G.
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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2012, 02:58:27 AM »

Hi Steve, welcome to the forum and the wide world of HHO. Grin

Pros:
Can't really think of any general ones, maybe there are vehicle specific advantages?

Cons:
You will find it difficult to use a PWM if you need/want to.
The chassis of a vehicle often isn't a reliable, low resistance connection at the current levels we tend to use.

OK, there's nothing "wrong" with doing that if it suits your particular application, it probably makes for a less versatile reactor though.

Did you have a particular reason for building it that way?
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ROADTRASH
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2012, 06:51:11 AM »

thanks for the reply just thought it would be less wires to have to run
it seems to work
 I am confused about the PWM
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D.O.G.
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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2012, 04:32:10 PM »

A Pulse Width Modulator serves to control the current in a circuit while maintaining full voltage.
It works by switching on and off many times a second, the width of the pulse thus generated can by varied to power the circuit for a shorter or longer percentage of that second.
If one was connected to the headlights of your car, the effect would look similar ( but electrically quite different) to an ordinary dimmer switch on your house lighting.

Most commercially available PWM's are designed to switch the negative (ground) leg of a circuit, so you would have to isolate (rubber mount, or similar) the reactor from the chassis before the PWM would work. All the cheap e-bay ones are like this.

It is possible to get or build a PWM designed to switch the positive leg of the circuit, in which case you could leave the reactor mounted directly to the chassis, but this may be a more expensive, or custom made, device.

Of course you don't have to use a PWM to control current. Many people simply adjust their electrolyte concentration to draw the current they want.
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